Regional Migration Analysis: 19-25 March 2016

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Blue-headed Vireo. Susan Young/Macaulay Library. 23 Mar 2016. eBird S28500257, ML 26057151

Continental Summary

Light to moderate flights along the Pacific Coast and in portions of the Desert Southwest highlighted the period in the West, while light to moderate flights reached their greatest extents on Tuesday night in the East.

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BirdCast West Region

Upper Midwest and Northeast

Aside from localized light movements in Virginia to kick off the weekend, migration was largely absent or highly localized for the first nights of the forecast period as cool air, frozen precipitation, and northerly flow came into the region. By Monday night, light to moderate flights occurred in the Upper Midwest where more favorable and warmer conditions returned. And by Tuesday night these conditions, the associated light to moderate flights, expanded to include most of the region in the action. However, a strong frontal boundary, and some nasty weather associated with it, began to shut down migration in the western reaches of the region by Wednesday, continuing to do so for almost the whole region by Thursday night. Migration to the east of this frontal passage continued to be light to moderate.

Top Movers

Increasing

Species Increase from Last Week % of Checklists Reporting
Osprey 107% 6.7
Golden-crowned Kinglet 66% 7.2
Great Egret 227% 2.2
Chipping Sparrow 81% 3.7
Tree Swallow 37% 13
Eastern Phoebe 34% 17.5
Double-crested Cormorant 45% 8
Louisiana Waterthrush 586% 0.4
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 87% 0.7
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 4942% 0.3
Black Vulture 54% 5.1
Blue-winged Teal 33% 4.4
Northern Flicker 29% 16.6
Fish Crow 48% 9.3
Turkey Vulture 16% 26.5
Brown Thrasher 56% 2
Yellow-throated Warbler 512% 0.3
Brown-headed Cowbird 22% 13.3
Pine Warbler 59% 3.1
Great Blue Heron 17% 11.8
Snowy Egret 808% 0.2
Wilson's Snipe 30% 2.4
Blue-headed Vireo 133% 0.2
Laughing Gull 39% 1.1

Decreasing

Species Decrease from Last Week % of Checklists Reporting
Tundra Swan -49% 1.3
Sandhill Crane -31% 4.3
Northern Pintail -33% 2.2
American Woodcock -31% 1.9
Redhead -34% 3.5
Ruddy Duck -27% 3.4
Greater White-fronted Goose -41% 0.7
Gadwall -26% 6.8
Common Goldeneye -25% 3.6
Canvasback -35% 1.7
American Wigeon -22% 5
Killdeer -11% 15.9
Barrow's Goldeneye -88% 0
American Bittern -91% 0
American Tree Sparrow -12% 8.3
Ross's Goose -46% 0.2
White-winged Scoter -30% 0.7
Horned Lark -15% 2.8
Snow Goose -12% 1.6
Greater Scaup -21% 2
Northern Shoveler -20% 7.9

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Red-eyed Vireo. Danny Sauvageau/Macaulay Library. 25 Mar 2016. eBird S28535545, ML 26136091

Gulf Coast and Southeast

The effects of a strong frontal passage kept things quiet for the first days of the forecast period. Some signs of life returned to the migration system by Monday night, when light to moderate flights occurred in Texas and Louisiana. These flights became more widespread on Tuesday night, with pockets of light and moderate migration across the region. Although the flights continued, albeit to a lesser geographic extent, on Wednesday night, Thursday saw the passage of another frontal boundary; migration shut down in its wake. Note, however, that southern Florida was still experiencing a locally moderate flight on Thursday night, to the south and east of the advancing frontal boundary’s precipitation.

Top Movers

Increasing

Species Increase from Last Week % of Checklists Reporting
Red-eyed Vireo 292% 1.5
Louisiana Waterthrush 76% 2.6
Hooded Warbler 145% 1.2
Yellow-throated Vireo 51% 2.3
Prothonotary Warbler 111% 1.2
Chimney Swift 62% 1.7
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 31% 3.8
Black-chinned Hummingbird 51% 2
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 17% 7.3
Pectoral Sandpiper 64% 1.6
Black-throated Green Warbler 124% 1.1
Worm-eating Warbler 494% 0.5
Black-necked Stilt 25% 6.2
Black-and-white Warbler 20% 8.4
Eastern Kingbird 211% 0.5
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 16% 16.2
Broad-winged Hawk 48% 1.3
Tree Swallow 15% 15.3
Chuck-will's-widow 49% 1.2
Baird's Sandpiper 174% 0.5
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 37% 1.9
Black Skimmer 32% 2.6
Least Tern 85% 0.5
Lesser Nighthawk -1141% 0.2
Bank Swallow 111% 0.3

Decreasing

Species Decrease from Last Week % of Checklists Reporting
Ring-necked Duck -36% 2.1
American Kestrel -29% 7.4
Eastern Phoebe -19% 14
Orange-crowned Warbler -30% 4.2
Cinnamon Teal -49% 0.6
White-crowned Sparrow -30% 2.3
Song Sparrow -15% 9.5
Horned Lark -43% 0.6
Green-winged Teal -24% 3.4
Yellow-rumped Warbler -11% 31.4
Field Sparrow -19% 4.7
Killdeer -17% 12.7
Gadwall -18% 4.4
Northern Flicker -14% 8.5

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Blue-gray Gnatcatcher. Patrick Van Thull/Macaulay Library. 25 Mar 2016. eBird S28535313, ML 26139191

Great Plains

A mostly quiet week, decidedly more like winter than like spring, saw little movement in the region on radar. Light migration was the highest intensity movement for the period, with such movements in the northern and central Plains on Sunday night and the central and southern Plains on Monday and Tuesday nights. Other than highly localized light flights outside of these movements, the region’s migration was largely stalled by the late season cold.

Top Movers

Increasing

Species Increase from Last Week % of Checklists Reporting
Turkey Vulture 45% 27.3
Great Egret 553% 2.3
Cinnamon Teal 711% 1.9
Common Loon 142% 3.2
Herring Gull 93% 4.1
Ruddy Duck 31% 13.2
Purple Martin 42% 2.9
Common Grackle 19% 27.4
Blue-winged Teal 21% 15.6
American Pipit 74% 2.2
American Golden-Plover 59% 1.4
Tree Swallow 28% 5.3
Least Sandpiper 48% 1.6
Vesper Sparrow 40% 2.1
House Finch 20% 20.8
Snowy Plover 76% 0.9
Eared Grebe 62% 1.1
Cedar Waxwing 16% 11.8
Lesser Scaup 16% 14.9
Western Meadowlark 25% 17.7
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 85% 0.6
Tundra Swan 33% 2

Decreasing

Species Decrease from Last Week % of Checklists Reporting
Lincoln's Sparrow -57% 0.7
American Goldfinch -26% 11.9
Sandhill Crane -30% 5.4
Blue Jay -12% 22.9
Marsh Wren -53% 0.5
Hermit Thrush -61% 0.3
Belted Kingfisher -23% 3.9
Harris's Sparrow -20% 10.6
Fish Crow -42% 2
Pine Warbler -49% 0.3
Eastern Phoebe -21% 14.9
Song Sparrow -16% 15.6
Common Redpoll -23% 1.8
American Woodcock -19% 0.3
Say's Phoebe -77% 0
Ferruginous Hawk -48% 0.2
American Crow -4% 31

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Scott’s Oriole. C. Jackson/Macaulay Library. 4 Mar 2016. eBird S27971176, ML 25313861

West

Light and moderate flights from the Pacific Northwest south and east through the Desert Southwest highlighted the weekend’s migration scene. Scattered precipitation in the western and northern portions of the region then proceeded to shut down most movements in those areas, while locally light flights continued in the Desert Southwest to begin the work week. The mountainous portions of the region were generally cool this week, favoring highly localized light movements if they occurred. As disturbances responsible for precipitation earlier in the period moved east, slightly more favorable conditions returned to portions of the Pacific Coast, where light to moderate migration returned locally to end the period.

Top Movers

Increasing

Species Increase from Last Week % of Checklists Reporting
Lucy's Warbler 91% 4.3
Violet-green Swallow 40% 8
Hooded Oriole 53% 3.9
Bell's Vireo 62% 2.5
Pacific-slope Flycatcher 48% 2.5
Turkey Vulture 22% 21.9
Tree Swallow 23% 13.8
Barn Swallow 37% 4.2
Black-chinned Hummingbird 59% 1.9
Wilson's Warbler 50% 2
White-winged Dove 40% 4.6
House Wren 27% 5.1
Yellow Warbler 61% 1.4
Orange-crowned Warbler 25% 8.2
Purple Finch 27% 3.7
Painted Redstart 78% 1.1
Warbling Vireo 50% 1.3
Osprey 26% 4.1
Rufous Hummingbird 20% 4.6
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 28% 7.9
Scott's Oriole 139% 0.4
Mourning Dove 10% 29.8

Decreasing

Species Decrease from Last Week % of Checklists Reporting
Brown Pelican -49% 1.3
Semipalmated Plover -78% 0.1
Brant -39% 1
Heermann's Gull -53% 0.4
Brandt's Cormorant -37% 1.4
Ruddy Turnstone -77% 0.1
Red-breasted Merganser -25% 2.3
Ring-billed Gull -19% 7.4
Elegant Tern -60% 0.2
Willet -25% 2.4
Surf Scoter -27% 3.4
Red-throated Loon -36% 0.9
Marbled Godwit -25% 2.1
Spotted Sandpiper -25% 1.3
Black-bellied Plover -28% 1.1
Royal Tern -31% 0.5
Least Sandpiper -22% 2.1
Common Loon -28% 1.5
Long-billed Curlew -28% 1.4
Sanderling -36% 0.8
Rhinoceros Auklet -43% 0.2

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