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Lights Out

Footnotes

Lights Out Texas

[1] Kenneth V Rosenberg et al., “Decline of the North American avifauna,” Science 366, no. 6461 (2019).

[2] Scott R. Loss et al., “Bird–building collisions in the United States: Estimates of annual mortality and species vulnerability,” The Condor 116, no. 1 (Feb 2014), https://doi.org/10.1650/condor-13-090.1, <Go to ISI>://WOS:000335611300003

http://www.bioone.org/doi/pdf/10.1650/CONDOR-13-090.1; S. R. Loss, T. Will, and P. Marra, “Direct Mortality of Birds from Anthropogenic Causes,” in Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics, Vol 46, ed. D. J. Futuyma, Annual Review of Ecology Evolution and Systematics (2015).

[3] Cohen EB Cabrera-Cruz SA, Smolinsky JA, Buler JJ, “Artificial Light at Night is Related to Broad-Scale Stopover Distributions of Nocturnally Migrating Landbirds along the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.,” Remote Sensing 12, no. 3 (2020); Horton et al., “Bright lights in the big cities: migratory birds’ exposure to artificial light.”; Frank A La Sorte et al., “Seasonal associations with urban light pollution for nocturnally migrating bird populations,” Global Change Biology  (2017); James D McLaren et al., “Artificial light at night confounds broad‐scale habitat use by migrating birds,” Ecology letters 21, no. 3 (2018); Benjamin M Van Doren et al., “High-intensity urban light installation dramatically alters nocturnal bird migration,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 114, no. 42 (2017).

[4] Adriaan M Dokter et al., “Seasonal abundance and survival of North America’s migratory avifauna determined by weather radar,” Nature ecology & evolution  (2018); Horton et al., “Holding steady: Little change in intensity or timing of bird migration over the Gulf of Mexico.”

 

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[1] Kyle G Horton et al., “Holding steady: Little change in intensity or timing of bird migration over the Gulf of Mexico,” Global change biology 25, no. 3 (2019).

[2] Van Doren et al., “High-intensity urban light installation dramatically alters nocturnal bird migration.”

 

 

All pages

Kyle G Horton et al., “Bright lights in the big cities: migratory birds’ exposure to artificial light,” Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment  (2019).

Kyle G Horton et al., “Holding steady: Little change in intensity or timing of bird migration over the Gulf of Mexico,” Global change biology 25, no. 3 (2019).

Van Doren et al., “High-intensity urban light installation dramatically alters nocturnal bird migration.”

Kenneth V Rosenberg et al., “Decline of the North American avifauna,” Science 366, no. 6461 (2019).

Scott R. Loss et al., “Bird–building collisions in the United States: Estimates of annual mortality and species vulnerability,” The Condor 116, no. 1 (Feb 2014), https://doi.org/10.1650/condor-13-090.1, <Go to ISI>://WOS:000335611300003

http://www.bioone.org/doi/pdf/10.1650/CONDOR-13-090.1; S. R. Loss, T. Will, and P. Marra, “Direct Mortality of Birds from Anthropogenic Causes,” in Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics, Vol 46, ed. D. J. Futuyma, Annual Review of Ecology Evolution and Systematics (2015).

Cohen EB Cabrera-Cruz SA, Smolinsky JA, Buler JJ, “Artificial Light at Night is Related to Broad-Scale Stopover Distributions of Nocturnally Migrating Landbirds along the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.,” Remote Sensing 12, no. 3 (2020); Horton et al., “Bright lights in the big cities: migratory birds’ exposure to artificial light.”; Frank A La Sorte et al., “Seasonal associations with urban light pollution for nocturnally migrating bird populations,” Global Change Biology  (2017); James D McLaren et al., “Artificial light at night confounds broad‐scale habitat use by migrating birds,” Ecology letters 21, no. 3 (2018); Benjamin M Van Doren et al., “High-intensity urban light installation dramatically alters nocturnal bird migration,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 114, no. 42 (2017).

Adriaan M Dokter et al., “Seasonal abundance and survival of North America’s migratory avifauna determined by weather radar,” Nature ecology & evolution  (2018); Horton et al., “Holding steady: Little change in intensity or timing of bird migration over the Gulf of Mexico.”

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