News: Species on the Move

Species on the Move
By Benjamin Van Doren The Cornell Lab Apr 17, 2017

We’ve created a new tool to update us as species advance through their arrivals in each region, using data from eBird. We assign each species to four possible categories: Not Yet Arrived, Arrival Beginning, Approaching Peak, or Peaking. Then, we look for transitions between categories to tell us how each species is progressing through these […]  Read more...

Species on the Move
By Benjamin Van Doren and Andrew Farnsworth The Cornell Lab Apr 08, 2017

We've created a new tool to update us as species advance through their arrivals in each region. We assign each species to four possible categories, and we look for transitions between categories to tell us how each species is progressing through these stages. Most of the action is happening in the southeast, as we expect for this time of year. But this will not be true for long!  Read more...

Species on the Move
By Andrew Farnsworth The Cornell Lab Apr 02, 2017

On our 28 March arrival update, we highlighted the late arrival of Chimney Swifts into the US this spring. In the last several days, we’ve seen a big increase in eBird reports of swifts, and the 10-day delay we wrote about earlier seems to have evaporated!  Read more...

Species on the Move
By Benjamin Van Doren The Cornell Lab Mar 28, 2017

The last several days have seen significant movements of birds in the US. Here are the highlights: On March 20th, we predicted a big influx of Scissor-tailed Flycatchers: Scissor-tailed Flycatchers are poised for a big entrance in the next week #GulfCoast #migration pic.twitter.com/jfLfnIsQMs — Team BirdCast (@DrBirdCast) March 20, 2017 We can now report that […]  Read more...

Species on the Move
By Benjamin Van Doren The Cornell Lab Mar 25, 2017

Species currently on the move in the United States include: Louisiana Waterthrush Great Egret Ruby-throated Hummingbird Osprey Red-eyed Vireo Hooded Warbler Prothonotary Warbler  Read more...

Species on the Move
By Andrew Farnsworth The Cornell Lab Nov 23, 2015

Some seriously anomalous displays of displacement, entrainment, diversion, and irruption, highlighted the birding landscape of 2012. Of particular note was the unprecedented invasion of Razorbills in the southeastern US and the Gulf of Mexico. BirdCast spent some time chronicling these events and begins a discussion of whether 2015 might see a similar occurrence.  Read more...

Species on the Move
By Andrew Farnsworth The Cornell Lab Mar 13, 2015

American Robin is a sure sign of spring for many, whether you wait patiently for the first migrants to scamper across a lawn that is (finally) not icy or white (can you tell that parts of the eastern US are very ready for spring?) or eagerly anticipate the rambling and melodic caroling of a robin in your back yard. […]  Read more...

Species on the Move
By Andrew Farnsworth The Cornell Lab Jan 26, 2015

Team BirdCast spent some effort last year to discuss vagrancy in Purple Gallinules in late fall and winter (see this post). As a very short addendum to that story, we have been looking at the track record for vagrant gallinules so far this winter: several interesting records have already come to light including 1 from Morocco, […]  Read more...

Species on the Move
By Andrew Farnsworth The Cornell Lab May 06, 2014

This weekend’s species on the move highlights movements in the West. Several species are right on time in the West, following the last decade’s patterns of reporting. These include Spotted Sandpiper, Swainson’s Thrush, Yellow Warbler, Western Tanager, and Black-headed Grosbeak. Also of note was a suite of major coastal movements in southern California associated with the […]  Read more...

Species on the Move
By Andrew Farnsworth The Cornell Lab Apr 22, 2014

This week we highlight species on the move over the past weekend in the Southeastern US, including a number reported in frequencies substantially in advance of the 2004-2013 average (like Swainson’s and Wood Thrushes, Black-throated Blue and Cape May Warblers, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, and Scarlet Tanagers). Of course, not all species are moving in advance of the average […]  Read more...

Species on the Move
By Andrew Farnsworth The Cornell Lab Apr 14, 2014

This week’s species on the move discussion highlights some advanced arrivals gleaned from this past weekend’s eBird reports. Northern Parula is being reported with greater frequency than the 10-year average for this date in the Great Plains and Upper Midwest and Northeast. This is particularly true in the Great Plains, where a huge spike in […]  Read more...

Species on the Move
By Andrew Farnsworth The Cornell Lab Apr 08, 2014

Species on the move this week features birds that are catching up on their schedules, exploding on to the scene, and falling out. Eastern Phoebes finally began to arrive in large numbers in the Northeast, effectively erasing delays in arrivals experienced during previous weeks. Orchard Orioles are now appearing on checklists with frequencies more like […]  Read more...

Species on the Move
By Andrew Farnsworth The Cornell Lab Apr 01, 2014

Here’s a brief review of some species that showed substantial changes in reporting on eBird this past weekend. Hooded Orioles have been on the move in the last week, appearing in slightly more reports than the last decade’s average. Bullock’s Oriole, however, seems to be right on track with the last ten years of reports. […]  Read more...

Species on the Move
By Andrew Farnsworth The Cornell Lab Mar 26, 2014

2014 may be a year to remember for linking bird movements to patterns of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies. Many along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts will certainly remember the winter of 2012-2013 for, among other reasons, the crazy Razorbill invasion in the southeastern US and Florida, and even into the Gulf of Mexico and its […]  Read more...

Species on the Move
By Benjamin Van Doren The Cornell Lab Mar 24, 2014

Here’s a brief recap of of some species that showed substantial changes in reporting on eBird this past weekend. From the Great Lakes and Northeast region, several species took advantage of favorable conditions, especially in the early part of the weekend. Tree Swallows, Eastern Phoebe, Blue-winged Teal, and Osprey all made moves during this time.   Interesting, […]  Read more...

Migration
By Benjamin Van Doren The Cornell Lab Mar 18, 2014

Once again, we’ll highlight some species that took advantage of the weekend to move. First, let’s check in with Red-necked Grebe again. Recall that at this time last week, this species was on the increase in the Upper Midwest and Northeast. We interpreted this peak as “numerous displaced and confused winter birds still finding many areas […]  Read more...

Species on the Move
By Andrew Farnsworth The Cornell Lab Mar 11, 2014

In this new weekly (or almost weekly) feature Team BirdCast will be highlighting particular species that are departing, arriving, or just plain moving in very obvious (or not!) ways. Warbling Vireo: the eBird map below shows the most recent reports of this species, highlighting the first migrants appearing in southern California and Arizona. Red-necked Grebe: […]  Read more...

Species on the Move
By Andrew Farnsworth The Cornell Lab Feb 12, 2014

Purple Gallinules are well known as champions of long-distance vagrancy, with records from as far north as Iceland, as far south as South Georgia Island, as far west as the Galapagos Islands, and as far east as Italy and South Africa (West and Hess 2002). This species, and many other rails, are habitat-based dispersalists, adapted […]  Read more...

Species on the Move
By Andrew Farnsworth The Cornell Lab Sep 23, 2013

Birders along the Pacific Coast of the US, along with The Weather Channel and the Los Angeles Times, have certainly noticed the recent invasion of Blue-footed Boobies in California, whether you’ve read about it on eBird or seen it in person. Similar large-scale movements are occurring for other species along the Pacific Coast (for example, […]  Read more...

Species on the Move
By Andrew Farnsworth The Cornell Lab Apr 08, 2013

With warm air prevailing across the region, sky watchers should plan to spend a little time looking for Swallow-tailed Kites. April is traditionally a good month to find a wandering individual or two of this southern species in locations far to the north of typical present-day breeding locations. This map shows April observations of the […]  Read more...

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